Anorexia Nervosa

There is a 5.6 percent mortality rate per decade due to either cardiac arrest or suicide for those with anorexia nervosa. The prevalence of anorexia nervosa among women ranges from 0.5 to 3.7 percent in various studies. Eating disorders are more commonly seen among females with a male-female ratio of 1:9.

Some of the warning signs for anorexia nervosa include:

  1. Extreme weight loss
  2. Intense fear of gaining weight even though underweight
  3. Denial of the seriousness of the current low body weight

Some of the medical complications of anorexia nervosa include:

  1. Cardiac conduction delays, cardiac arrhythmias, and cardiac arrests
  2. Gastroparesis (slowness of the stomach emptying)
  3. Osteoporosis – which can result in increased risks of bone fractures
  4. Amenorrhea and infertility
  5. Electrolyte disturbances especially phosphorus – which can especially occur during the process of weight restoration and blood tests need to be done periodically to monitor for this particular complication
  6. Anemia, low white blood cell counts, and low platelets counts
  7. Loss of hair from low protein levels
  8. Hypotension, lightheadedness, and syncopal episodes (fainting episodes due to low blood pressure)
  9. Hypothermia and coldness in the extremities such as the hands and feet
  10. Memory difficulties and problems with concentration
  11. Elevated liver function tests secondary to steatohepatitis

People who suffer from anorexia nervosa are also more likely than those in the general population to suffer from:

  1. Major depressive disorder
  2. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  3. Social anxiety disorder
  4. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Bulimia Nervosa

Some of the warning signs for bulimia nervosa include:

  1. Binge eating or eating large amounts of food more than what most people would eat under similar circumstances occurring on the average of at least 1 time per week for at least 3 months
  2. Loss of control during these eating episodes occurring on average at least 1 time per week for at least 3 months

And the presence of at least one of these purging behaviors occurring on average of at least 1 time per week for at least 3 months:

  1. Self-induced vomiting
  2. Misuse of laxatives
  3. Misuse of diuretics
  4. Misuse of enemas
  5. Misuse of diet pills
  6. Fasting for greater than 24 hours
  7. Engaging in excessive amounts of exercise

And there is an extreme disturbance in the way your body weight or shape is experienced which results in severe self-scrutiny.

Some of the medical complications of bulimia nervosa include:

  1. Loss of the enamel layer of the teeth
  2. Parotid gland enlargement that results in appearance of swollen cheeks
  3. Esophageal erosions from the acid in the vomitus that can result in esophageal bleeding and esophageal metaplasia (cancerous or precancerous cells developing)
  4. Electrolyte disturbances like low or high potassium levels for those who purge by vomiting and low magnesium levels for those who purge by using laxatives and either low potassium levels or low magnesium levels for those who purge by using diuretics
  5. Menstrual abnormalities and irregular menstrual cycles
  6. Fluid retention
  7. Cathartic colon and small bowel obstructions for those who purge by using laxatives or enemas in excess
  8. Rupture of the esophagus that can result in a pneumothorax (collapse of lungs) for those purge by vomiting

People who suffer from bulimia nervosa are also more likely than those in the general population to suffer from:

  1. Major depressive disorder
  2. Social anxiety disorder
  3. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  4. Substance abuse

Binge Eating Disorder

Some of the warning signs for binge eating disorder include:

  1. Binge eating or eating large amounts of food more than what most people would eat under similar circumstances occurring on the average of at least 1 time per week for at least 6 months
  2. Loss of control during these eating episodes occurring on average at least 1 time per week for at least 6 months

Some of the medical complications of binge eating disorder include weight gain and therefore obesity related medical conditions including:

  1. Diabetes mellitus type II
  2. Hypertension
  3. Hypercholesterolemia
  4. Obstructive sleep apnea
  5. Increased risk for certain cancers such as breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and colon cancer
  6. Gall stones
  7. Elevated liver function tests secondary to steatohepatitis
  8. Coronary artery disease and myocardial infarctions

People who suffer from binge eating disorder are also more likely than those in the general population to suffer from:

  1. Major depressive disorder
  2. Social anxiety disorder
  3. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  4. Substance abuse

Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder

Some of the warning signs of avoidant restrictive food intake disorder includes:

An eating or feeding disturbance (an apparent lack of interest in eating or food; avoidance based on the sensory characteristics of food; concern about aversive consequences of eating) as manifested by persistent failure to meet appropriate nutritional and/or energy needs associated with one or more of the following:

  1. Significant weight loss or failure to achieve expected weight gain or faltering growth in children
  2. Significant nutritional deficiency
  3. Dependence on enteral feeding or oral nutritional supplements
  4. Marked interference with psychosocial functioning
  5. The disturbance is not better explained by lack of available food or by an associated culturally-sanctioned practice

Substance Abuse Program

Our program provides outpatient treatment for those suffering from all types of chemical dependency, opioid dependency, alcohol use, sedative hypnotic use, cannabis use, amphetamine abuse, cocaine abuse, etc. We believe in the importance of treating chemical dependency and the co-occurring conditions such as depression, anxiety, PTSD, relationship issues, codependency, fears and phobias, grief issues, and eating disorders. Our program includes individual and group psychotherapy (with emphasis on relapse prevention), psychiatric evaluations, marital and family therapy, and possibility of medical care for primary care issues. Our medication assisted program for opioid dependency includes treatment with combination buprenorphine/naloxone (suboxone, zubsolv, bunavail) with an initial psychiatric evaluation, medication management on 28 day intervals, group psychotherapy for relapse prevention on 28 day intervals, and opportunities for individual psychotherapies from master’s level therapists.

Another unique aspect of our program is our integrated Christian faith-based component. We have chaplain on staff who can meet with individuals for spiritual counseling as well. We believe in the importance and healing power of faith in treatment and recovery and will respect and honor everyone’s spirituality. Our staff live out their faith in part by treating clients with love, compassion, and respect.

We also have dedicated facility for our program.
The address is:
4005 Travis Drive
Nashville, TN 37211
(615) 724-0865